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for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the deal creating the world's largest airline became official today. american airlines emerged from bankruptcy to join with u.s. airways. the new carrier will operate under the american airlines name. the merger leaves four airlines controlling more than 80% of the american travel market. passengers won't see immediate changes to reservations or frequent flyer programs, and it remains unclear if the deal will mean higher fares. eight of the most prominent u.s. tech companies, including apple, google and facebook, are calling for tighter controls on government surveillance. they sent an open letter to president obama today, in the wake of revelationshat the go
been credited with new breakthroughs in the study of medical science, including aids and mental health. this morning on the "washington journal" we want to focus on the nih and give you an opportunity to find out more about the agency. francis s. collins joins us live. >> it is great to be here. >> you are the director of the nih. what is your objective? guest: we are the largest searcher -- researcher in the world. we focus on how life works at the most detailed level, and partly to apply that and come up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. we support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists who are working from everything from cancer, to hiv-aids, two timers -- o all alzheimer's. you name it. we want to talk more about that, in terms of sequestration. you form to this as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget? how many people work for the and age? billion.9 the number of people who work for us focus on the work that we do from the grants that we give across the country, a
a decade or two of really getting the kind of science we needed to make that case and to understand the brain as being the basis of both normal and abnormal behavior. host: the president talking about the brain initiative, calling this the next major american project -- what is he talking about? guest: to put that into context, he was thinking about the last two great american projects in science. one was the apollo project to put a man on the moon. and then the human genome project. the next great american project is what he is calling the brain initiative. and that is an initiative that will involve several government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so
it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will phil tores, an entimologist. the by onic arm. see how it's more
and science over great britain attended this meeting. and he said. he's very prompt the ball falls on all of them wood education in the united kingdom this is something absolutely a very insistent that the minister biggest biggest cheer. and because it's the uk says a leading company in education especially in the higher education system. i am from higher education myself and by unnoticed. pros the stairwell and the tallest reduce the chosen most or the united kingdom. plus the ride this this and other countries also but yes it did of those gatherings expressed the their pride then it probably didn't throw that they have returned and there with him for the benefit of all comfort and. presents they gave them a bit of wood to smile and say you do. it was amongst the class to class and the present the route to his strategy. kazakhstan two thousand fifty. and that these new generation of specialists. all of them have c'mon go to english. and the present. it affected the staff and when there was no time when one hundred and no one thousand and five hundred people speaking english. without tha
at mcdonald's anymore or burger king. none of the food tastes right. they had a science project to tell me how many people have food -- ieating good still eat chitlins. was 13.d smoking when i what is this stuff going on for? it is not making people live longer. it is making people live longer. the lifespan span in the united states is going up. sure what genetic modification has to do with that. if you are eating genetically modified foods, if you are eating foods from the supermarket, just from the produce section, the chances are you are not eating anything that is genetically modified. there is a long list of foods that are not genetically modified. the only ones that i know about for short that are available are the genetically out of five papaya from hawaii -- the only ones that i know about for sure that are available are the genetically modified papaya from hawaii. if you bought them from stateside supermarkets, they llyl come from genetica modified varieties. i have been told there are some squash that come from genetically modified varieties. the percentages, i have been told, are no
for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, best calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent livelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were subject, john simmons has enabled generations of women to lead and self advocate, empowered with their own resources. those of us who have delighted so enormously from john simmons's philanthropy are delighted to be with you to witness the work of our founders contemporary, angelina grimke. we hope you enjoy the evening, and thank you for joining us. [applause] >> we have got some powerhouses in the audience with us tonight. not just here on the stage. we want to acknowledge some of the remarkable women officeholders who are present as well as their male allies. i will ask each group to stand and remain standing. please hold your applause until the end. i know that is going to be tough but really try. we are honored to have present tonight a number of women who were each the first woman to hold a different statewide office.
its own them and teach it teaches the course of six japanese language math and science concepts the little kid. fourth grade. the range of studies becomes more comprehensive and include subjects such as computing sixth graders. home economics subjects like sony it is. when getting english language classes the hungry and teachers of proclaiming cheapskate inspections. some subjects like music. pupils leave the room into a special touch the music is tuned to a cooling you can tune into playing instruments and to sing. the he would choke people's needs and do craft projects. ace ten seconds the date and time. it's more of what the body of a platoon of us. sports meet lots of space a practice to do some sports. i know. sports the medium and small special equipment. don't image experience. it's time for lunch. indeed most schools pupils will be newer and faster. st jude's kenya korea builds the gym and other corman groups. joining a sports car has the solution is to make new friends. since each club will have members from when fourth to sixth grade. the club to greek cookery across.
discovered by the telescope. >> you are kind of the nsa of science. >> yeah, i guess that's a way of putting it. we are the collection agency for universal radiation. >> why the quiet zone? >> the energy that it normally receives is equivalent to the energy of an by a single snowflake hitting the ground. >> with no white noise on the radio or cell phone use, living in green bank is like traveling back in time. >> your life is a little slower, old-fashioned. >> general store sells everything and if you need to call home, use the payphone. it's a couple of miles down the road. and in case you were wondering, it costs $.50 to make a local call these days. >> and ring they have someone to enforce -- and they have someone to enforce the rules around town. most residents comply, but there is some rebellion. >> someone used to have a wi-fi access point set up and the name of it was "s crewyounraoprivateproperty." >> i live in the city and it drives me crazy. >> i said, listen. and everybody looked around and said, i don't hear nothing. and i said, that's what i like about this. >> greenburg, west v
. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the n
all source analysts and combining these capabilities management,ion targeting, science and technology, bring to bear significant capability and these types off skills and capabilities, and others, they all brought of aneath the construct center concept. the integrated intelligence center construct, uniquely tied into our war fighting combat in and commands, part of the defense intelligence enterprise, provided full spectrum intelligence, synchronizing capabilities and eliminating redundancies. i will not stand here until you we will eliminate every redundancy, but i will tell you, it is one of the areas we have to try to work toward. understanding who is doing what to whom. as a longtime intelligence officer, you meet the demands of your customer. your customer is a commander. customerustom-made -- is the secretary of defense for the present, you answer that question. somebody else answers it for their boss, so be it. if somebody wants a call that redundant, so be it. inis the world we live in dealing with the here and now and the threats we face today and to keep us out of conflict,
to help. and there was tons of evidence that began to yes merge, very good social science came out in the '80s and '90s that made that indisputable. i rethought my assumptions. what's the better way to help those that need to be helped. what's the better way to organization society so they can be free and flourish. and it wasn't hard from there to go to essentially where i am today, a believer in smaller government, more limited government, more individual freedom and liberty and also prevent the leviathan state, the big state, the entitlement state that liberals are so enamored of from crushing the institution, family and church and community and association that are the essence of american society. because that is one of the side effects of big government, and they are these treasured institutions that nurture the individual and they are the engines of american genius and american liberty. >> you see a lot of college students who are very idealistic. do you think some day the height will come on for some of them? and how do you talk to college students and say hey, here's where i
on to get there. >> i'm joined by derrick pitts, scientist at the franklin institute science museum. there's disagreement over the last few days about what happened to ison. nasa says it's a gonna, is there something there in. >> i think what happened, antonio was a to usle between this not very well consolidated nucleus, the gravitational pull of the sun and the heat of the sun, the heat of the sun sublime, frozen gases and the loosely compacted material left in the nucleus in the comments had nothing to hold it together. the solar wind took care of it after that. as we look at the images from the satellites looking at the sun. what we see is what's left of ison, a mere shadow of its former self. >> no hope that we'll get a good show in the sky. >> i don't think we'll see much from the ground. folks will be out with binoculars. a big telescope under dark skies might show us a whisk of what is left. it's left to the satellites on orbit. >> the possibility of it hitting earth was ruled out before it passed the sun. is there a chance that it blew apart and there are fragments that something
an hour last night. science 'tis say mt. aetna is europe's most active volcano. >> how old -- cold it's going to be near you is next. 's when i td with my doctor. he gave me some blood tests... showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% testosterone gel. the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with applicati sites. discontinue andgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with bt cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breast-feeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in t
the practice. it call comes down to science. knows his stuff.he says releasing commercially grown butterflys into the wild is wrong. , "i' notion or >> reporter: it's a tradition that has been around for years, releasing butterflies for special events, especially weddings. leo o'brien studies butterflies. >> reporter: he says commercially releasing them into the wild is wrong. >> i'm trying to shut down the motion or the impulse that these are party favors for any event. that's really the crux. >> reporter: the monarch butterflies are not endangered, not protected, not in short supply. monarch farming as it is called is a multimillion dollar national business. >> they are wildlife. they are not things. >> reporter: the san francisco commission on the environment is considering a proposal to ban butterfly releases in the city. >> the commercial release of butterflies really offsets some of the scientific research that folks are doing to try to monitor and to keep an effective count on what the native specious looks like. >> reporter: monarch papers say they don't breed, they are sterile and p
planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. because you can't beat zero heartburn. woo hoo! [ male announcer ] prilosec otc is the number one doctor recommended frequent heartburn medicine for 8 straight years. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. the day building a play set begins with a surprise twinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ and you work hard to get to the next level. it feels good when you reach point b, but you're not done. for you, "b" is not the end. capella university will take you further, because our competency-based curriculum gives you skills you can apply immediately, to move your career forward. to your point "c." capella university. start your journey at capella.edu. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident fo
. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> one of the biggest cities in america is shut down because of a massive win storm that's faegting the entire midwest. major highways across the dallas/ft. worth area have been closed until further notice. with temperature dipping into the 20s which right now is colder than in anchorage, alaska, the dallas marathon has been officially cancel for the first time in its 26-year history. ed, how much ice so far has fallen on that region? >> well, across the region depending on where you are. between one and four inches of ice or sleet has fallen. it was supposed to be the beginning of the festivity holiday weekend around here has turned into a silent night. it is a nightmare. a haunting description, ice, trees encased by freezing rain are buckling under the sheer weight of the ice. home left without power. crews are trying to salvage the lines still working and the roadways are a hazardous mess. >> go slowly. watching out for the person in fr
this looks like science-fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> you get your package. we can do half hour delivery. designee said years away but he went on to say maybe four or five. he said the plan is not practical and wouldn't work for all items. >> he's one of the new tech geniuses. i got to say, this is a good indication that this guy, just like steve jobs before him, dropping a lot of acid. dropping a lot of acid because that will never happen. >> you have a tremendous tree line here. i can't quite get the drone in. what about a parking lot. >> how do you get it to -- >> does not happen. >> weekly reader things there will be flying cars by the end of the century. >> are you still reading "weekly reader." >> i still read "weekly reader." >> amazon is amazing. >> how do you do it in a city. >> dropped to your whole building. >> they are amazon. >> they can do anything. >> they can do everything. order diapers and they are there by dinner time. >> they can be here before you get off the set. >> i often am
attention to a new report from the nation's premiere scientific body, the national academy of sciences. we typically associate climate change with gradual, longer term problems. according to the academy, climate change could also pose a risk of rapid hard to predict environmental changes that have the potential to cause widespread damage in the near term. the report warns that the collapse of the polar sea ice could send sea levels soaring. the destruction of the coral reefs could cause mass extinction of sea life, the elimination of summer sea ice in the arctic could alter the world's weather patterns. these tipping points could happen suddenly. it's reckless to do nothing in face of these threats. if there is a 10% chance that these threats would happen, it's irresponsible for us to ignore it. dr. richard alley, one of the authors said, you can't see it coming. you can't prepare for it. congress is irresponsible if we don't take this issue seriously. to pass on our planet worthy of our children and grandchildren's future. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . the n
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> this is bbc world news america. funding of this
, a not-for-profit think tank in the washington dc area that focuses on the issues of science and technology and how science and technology is changing our society for almost 17 years now we have been the host at home for the international terrorism studies have it up by professor yonah alexander and i think most people here would agree and understand that the center that yonah heads up is one of the most for most academic institutions and consortium of institutions in the world focusing on all aspects of terrorism. professor alexander blank group has looked up, studied and published documents on every conceivable realm and aspect of terrorism for many, many years and is personally and author of over 100 books on the subject and we are quite proud here at the potomac institute could be the home of his academic efforts. we are also privileged to partner with the international law institute and representing them as he always has and is the chairman of the international institute and for well over a decade we have partnered with professor wallace to bring to you these seminars an
you offer is this. >> you can learn things focussing on technology and computer science, being computer literate and so on to go and learn about big data or about how to do stuff on the web. you learn this online. go there, sign up and take a class. some of our classes are free. we also offer services such as mentoring, coaching and examination. you work with google and facebook to put their materials online. we get from them the most up to date, cutting edge stuff you need to know to be successful in the career of tech. you can learn this stuff. facebook teaches internally to it's engineers. so if you as a person want to be proficient in big data, go and sign up. >> does this replace a college degree or someone in the work place can use to add on a constant life learning, learning, learning? >> we think of it like a letter like continued learning, life long learning, staying up to date. our data suggests that too. very few come to us straight out of college or in college. most come to us, young professionals that want to understand the latest and best in technology. things tur
do to the our economy, secure life. with a look at this as a very real threat. no matter how science fiction it is to think about that happening. it could easily happen. it's our job to stop it. >> host: representative hunter, iran has not ended and f the country for more than 200 just. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries do proxy terrorist the they're in syria, ma lebanon. they are in a lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. so they haven't invaded because that's not what these countries do. what these countries do is when i say countries, countries like afghanistan, prewar, and iran, they have proxy care. they fund, promote and train at actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries. >> host: front page of "the new york times," i don't know if you saw this story. jihadists groups gain internal across the middle peace. >> guest: that's true. in fact, iraq and syria, ma especially because what you have is this. you have a rat line from syr
in agricultural sciences and earning his masters in business from delaware valley college, eric went to work for the pennsylvania department of agriculture. there he administered the rural youth grant program, led the county fair and agri tourism division and director for the central office in that department. he holds several leadership roles in the marcellus shale coalition, bringing together the two most important industries, energy and agriculture. eric is well deserving of this honor and we thank him for his leadership in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on
. this is a science which is why i use the boxing terminology. if you're at home and you know, boxing is known as the sweet science. they could have posted this at 12 noon instead of 6:00 a.m. and gotten dramatically more people seeing it. >> a store owner in new jersey thinks they've done it, they need to do so much more. you have another example, holiday inn. what's this retweet that they did? >> this is my favorite thing to hate on. there are way too many businesses retweeting nice things being said about them. let me make this point once and for all. if you retweet something that's being said about you that's awesome, you are bragging. >> you also have a tip, avoid one-way conversations. again, sort of the bull horn effect. what do you mean by this? >> again, it's that blasting out. i mean, social media is about listening as well. it's customer service. i wrote this book to build a manual for all of the people who have small businesses, a lot of people who have young entrepreneurs budding. entrepreneurship is exploding. i wanted to tactically show them how to do it. if you're talking about
is a sort of doomsday science that wobbles and pessimism. i recall the famous statement by president lyndon johnson when he described intelligence, he developed the memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down at the river as a young man, and he said he would get the bucket filled with pure milk and then the cat would relieve itself in the milk. and president johnson said the relief -- and he met relief in the bad way -- that was intelligence. [laughter] so you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] but there is another metaphor that i often hear and that is the famous woody allen comment that we in the intelligence community like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world and say, we are at a crossroads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. [laughter] and we hope you policymakers would be able to the wisdom to choose the right course. but, in fact, in my experience and the spirits i think we're going to relate today on the balkans is that intelligence is, when it works well, a collaborative ent
the first science monday evening. nothing was decided. the anti-government leader aim out of that saying they were no better off, there was no negotiation, it was a meet and greet situation. there have been reports that perhaps there are more mings taking place between those respective leaders. >> the dust is settling after a wild weekend of football. mark morgan is here to tell us about it. >> are you a college football fan? >>meh. >> i didn't expect a meh. here's the deal with number one alabama falling to auburn that in amazing finish saturday, the b.c.s. standards have shifted, boasting a new number one and number what. florida state moves into the top spot. the seminoles throttled florida over the weekend. ohio state is now second. the buckeyes squeaked by rainfall michigan, needing to stop a two-point conversion to hold on for the win. auburn to win over alabama had the tigers in third. missouri is now number five. >> 100 yards for the touchdown against alabama mauve set the stage for much discussion about which teams should be in the national title game. now auburn faces missouri
in the united states, saying it is the transportation and science committee -- as we move forward towards integrating drones into civilian life and capitalizing on the economic opportunities they offer, we must make certain that these aircraft's meet rigorous safety and privacy standards. the commerce committee said the hearing was already in the works before the amazon announcement on sunday. her knees from hartsdale, new -- bernice from hartsdale, new york on our support line. favor of using the drones because i just enrolled in a prescription d plan on medicare. i will get the best price if i use mail order to obtain my drugs. i take 14 prescription drugs. it is very difficult to keep things in order. in order to get the prescription i haveelivered on time, to call two weeks ahead of time. it seems insurmountable. however, if i saw that i was running out of drugs and they could be delivered in a half hour, it would be most helpful. i think for old ladies on prescription d, it might be a help. host: that is bernice from new york. this,ve probably heard but -- dylan from alabama, you are
by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year effort that's going to be there and i would say we look at mechanisms to assist her in her step in responding over the longer-term in assisting filipinas and developing. i will say it has been mentioned before, the filipino community has been quick to respond. it varies billion, very proud people and caring people and the government now is winding up in moving forward. recent leadership from the u.s., which i think they would welcome, they would be positioned well for the future. thank you. >> thank you so very much for the tremendous job catholic relief services is doing. we were fully briefed by joe curry while we were there and tom o'reilly took his bitterly around. we got to see the operation upfront and was extremely imp
, no matter how science fiction it feels to think about that happening, it could easily happen and it is our job to stop it. host: we have this tweet from calamity jane -- host: what do you say to that argument? syria rightis in now as a proxy terrorist. they are in all of these places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. they have not invaded because that is not what these countries do. what these countries -- by these countries i mean countries like , they have proxy terrorists. they fund, promote, and train bad actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize. front page this morning of "the new york times." "jihadist groups gain turmoil across the middle east, planning violence to present new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to raise concerns among american intelligence and counterterrorism officials that militants aligned with al qaeda could establish a base in syria capable of threatening israel and europe. -- europe." guest: that is absolutely true, especially in syria. you have a line from syria to iraq. that is how they get
is a better term, and industry science-based? >> i appreciate that question a great deal. the answer is we have put in place a number of new policy components that will begin to allow us to cover the entire. and it. i don't think we'll ever find the time when the american health sector diminishes in terms of imports and its reliance on technology. we are technologically driven in this country and that is a great asset in many respects, but a liability as well. it is an asset in that we've allowed the most technological means to be used in some cases that it made a difference. some people confuse our technology with our system, our marketplace. we have the best in the world. but we don't have the best sector in the world if you look at any performance criteria. i think we're the best technology in the world. a lot of people around the world want to access that technology. succumb to the united states to be able to do that. but what this law does and what i think a growing consensus, even in the private sector outside the law acknowledges that if we are really going to make a difference in t
do to a security wise. we have to look at this is a very real threat no matter how science fiction does to think about that happening. it could easily happen and it's our job to stop it. >> colon the gene tweets in represented hunter iran has not invaded another country for more than 200 years. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries through proxy terrorists. they are in a whole lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan so they haven't invaded because that is not with these countries do. with these countries do is end when i say countries i'm in countries like afghanistan prewar and iran have proxy wars and a fund to promote and train bad actors in their state bad bad actors in their state and send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries and kill and maim people. husk of the front page of "the new york times" and don't know if you saw this story. groups gain in turmoil across the mideast. violence has presented new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. my boyfriend has a lot of can't-miss moments. i checked out the windows phones and saw the lumia 1020 has 41 megapixels. so i can zoom way in even after i take the picture. and i can adjust the shot before i take it so i get it exactly how i want. so, i went with a windows phone. maybe i just see things other people don't. ♪ honestly ♪ i wanna see you be brave ♪ >>> there was a time when i was a young invincible. [ laughter ] after five years in this office people don't call me that any more. [ laughter ] i am not allowed for security reasons to have an iphone. [ laughter ] i don't know what your bills are. my suspicion is that for a lot of you between your cable bill u-phone bill, you're spending more than 100 bucks a month. the idea you wouldn't want to make sure that you got the health security and financial security that comes with health insurance for less than that price, you know, you guys are smarter than that and most young people are as well. >> that was president obama pitching obama
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